Comic Fodder

Final Crisis - I Heart Continuity

Last week I had a little bit of a conversation in the comments section of one of Travis's posts with a gentleman by the name of Earl Jones. I don't know Earl, but he seems like a good guy. I just happen to disagree with him.

To the casual observer (the non-superhero reading public) there's not much to distinguish Marvel from DC. In fact, its fairly routine that some press coverage botches who publishes what in fluff stories on Spider-Man, etc... But in the comic-concerned interwebs, those of us who watch these things know that the nation is not really split along party lines. We're really divided between Marvel and DC.

And DC of 2008 is the the Democratic Party of 2004.

What should be an appealing package of standard comic book ideas is being drowned out in a wicked combination of mediocre product and deafening internet chatter. The "John Kerry hates Freedom" of 2004 is DC's "DC's event comics should be able to be summarized in a single sentence" of 2008. Say it often enough and stay on message, and somehow it becomes true. Even when its not.

Remember a few weeks ago when the internet was abuzz going into HeroesCon with the strong belief that Dan Didio's contract wouldn't be renewed this fall? He was going to be bought out and replaced by, of all people, Jimmy Palmiotti? And people were excited by this...

As someone who follows substantially more DC than Marvel, perhaps its what I'm tuned in to, but the comment sections not just at Newsarama, but all over the place, have traditionally been far more negative. Including DC Comics' own message boards (which to wander through is a trying night for the soul. I don't recommend it.). DC supposedly moderates the comment threads to some extent, but I think these days they more or less let the fields run wild and fallow.

This isn't to dismiss disgruntled fans when DC does make a mistake. Countdown was an aggregious miscalculation, and I'm still waiting for a substantial apology. But picking on DC has become so commonplace, its a wonder if there's any signal to noise at this point that its a genuine question whether the hapless DC staffers who bother to read this stuff can actually gleen any useful information.

That said: DC's biggest comic release in months, Final Crisis #1, was targeted as a "failure" by many because it moved 144,000+ copies in its first month of release. Or, selling 1/3rd more copies than an All Star title has now become a mark of failure. At least according to industry followers and the doublethink of the internet community looking for a failure on the heels of "Countdown". Which was also deemed a failure with early predictions of cancellation of the series, despite the fact the series was still moving around 69,000 copies per week in the final weeks of the poorly received series. (That said, a failure that public from a narrative standpoint can't have been good for anyone).

The supposed failure of "Final Crisis" was chalked up not so much to sales figures, but to narrative problems. Online critics have bashed Final Crisis for a few reasons.
(a) the story is too complicated and should be summed up in a single sentence
(b) The story is steeped in continuity
(i) which I more or less followed, whether it was necessary to the plot or not, but I'd like to register my indignation, anyway
(ii) won't someone think of the children? This could be their very first comic, and they'd be so very, very confused.

It's Batman meets Scooby-Doo!

I confess to being a bit flabbergasted by the first criticism of "Final Crisis". It is true that Hollywood exists thanks to high-concept ideas, plus attractive women, plus explosions. The insistence that the reason "Secret Invasion" is selling so well, while "Final Crisis" is supposedly not (Secret Invasion outsold Final crisis by about 40,000 copies. Bully for Marvel on their success), is the one sentence concept.

I'm not sure I buy into that idea, or, if I do... I'm not sure I like what it says about the superhero comic reading public.

As discussed last week, ordering comics is done largely in advance. The sales figures are not reflective of how many comics moved from the hands of retailers to the hands of greedy comic readers like myself. Its indicative of how many comics were pre-sold to retailers through Diamond. Other factors may come into play here, from Marvel's "no-reprint" policy, driving up first week sales, to a general lack of affinity for Grant Morrison (there's still some folks crossing their arms in a huff over New X-Men).

But, DC also played the plot of Final Crisis fairly close to the vest. Versus Marvel's "We're doing 'They Live'", which they've been leading up to for a year. If the pre-orders weren't there, the likelihood of comics which were already sold having some affect on sales... makes no sense, one sentence plot or no. The 40,000 copy difference could be attributed to a lot of factors, but it seems unlikely that readers had a sense when going through Previews that "Gee, this plot should be one sentence for seven issues. Count me out."

A lot of these criticisms also appeared during the first issue of the series, which was more or less prologue to the main action of the series. Perhaps Morrison should have turned up the heat for the first issue, but this reader can't help buy wonder if those other reviewers were jumping to conclusions about a comic which they hadn't seen to even partial completion. How would any work in any other medium stand up to criticism if the reviewer wrote their review based upon the first few minutes?

Morrison's writing for the long haul in this one. Like many murder mysteries (see any Raymond Chandler novel) there are going to be a lot of twists and turns, and the initial murder is often just an excuse to get us into the plot. No doubt had the interwebs and their various factions existed upon the release of issue 1 of Watchmen, the reviews would have been not dissimilar. Its been through reading collections that Watchmen has been considered a stand-alone and quality work. But, surely, the forays into pirates and a murder which wasn't solved in the first issue would have been taken poorly in a world attuned to one or two issue self-contained stories.

This isn't to say I believe that Final Crisis will become the next Watchmen, but every story deserves a chance to tell itself. How many pages did the Hobbits lurk in the Shire before setting out? How long did the weddings cene last in the Godfather? How many minutes before we saw Chris Reeve in the suit?

By clamoring for one sentence plots, readers of super hero comics are selling themselves short. Not all stories need to be told like an 80's Simpson/ Bruckheimer movie, or fit neatly into packages that will do little but give the audience action-story comfort food with a plot they can recite from beginning to end without seeing a single page.

It all sort of reminds me of the endless, banal pitches of Altman's 1992 film "The Player." But rather than the studio chiefs cynically working through the one sentence pitch, its a Bizarro World in which fans are challenging the companies NOT to challenge them. And that, my friends, is a scary thought.

Real fanboys don't believe in continuity, except when they do

The other strongly expressed feeling regarding Final Crisis is that there's simply too much continuity that must be known to follow the story. There are several characters to whom readers did not feel sufficiently familiar, and the flashback bits didn't seem to be helping. At least that was the first issue complaint.

Moreover, the events of the issue didn't seem to fit terribly well with DC's lead in events: Countdown (to Final Crisis), and Death of the New Gods. Fair enough. This reader was registering his frustration here at Comic Fodder.

I firmly believe continuity DOES matter. It's the glue that holds serial narratives together. And while I understand different amounts of fudging when it comes to keeping a universe intact, the powers that be at DC were pretty clearly pulling a Captain Hazelwood at the wheel of the good ship Valdez/ Countdown-Final Crisis, it doesn't necessarily impact some of the other complaints.

I don't know DC continuity. Cater to me.

For good or ill, superhero comics from DC work in a linear fashion, with characters who have histories, with the DCU running back in time, in a very real sense, to 1938.

Some readers, such as former DC Editor KC Carlson, complained about the use of DC's vast history, pulling characters and plot from vestigal bits of the DCU in order to tell the story. It's unlikely that many readers hitting their local comic shop today bought the first issue of Martian Manhunter, and would know much about the Human Flame.

Its not necessarily required that readers picked up that first appearance of Martian Manhunter in order to get who The Human Flame is, or why he has a vendetta with J'onn J'onzz. Morrison gives The Human Flame a few lines to summarize that he was defeated by Martian Manhunter, and that ended a potentially lucrative career. It seems Morrison and Jones paint the Human Flame as a buffoon, from his ludicrous manner and insistence on callously snapping cell-phone photos of J'onzz's death. And that's all you need. But they were also kind enough to reprint the story recently in the DC Universe Special.

But all of that is somewhat academic.

The point is one I argued elsewhere sometime back, but which I'll put out there once again: DC is either allowed to tell stories based upon the history of the characters and work as a serial narrative, or they're only allowed to tell self-contained stories, none of which can affect the other. Human Flame and Libra may be a bit more obscure, but it's also not as if Morrison isn't doing due diligence in his storytelling to reveal enough to propel the events along.

And, yes, Libra is shrouded in mystery. I think you're not necessarily supposed to know everything about the character this early in the game.

Further, just as I was baffled by fan confusion over who Sue Dibny was when Identity Crisis hit, so was I surprised that self-professed DC fans couldn't identify Dan Turpin, a character who has appeared in comics regularly since the 1970's and who was a major part of "Superman: The Animated Series". For extra help, DC has been publishing the handy "Fourth World Omnibus" books (if you didn't buy them, you hate comics. Dwell on that.) which feature Turpin as part of the human equation that gets wrapped up in Darkseid's assault on Earth the first time around.

Morrison and Bendis are two very different writers. Bendis, who tends to tell a straightforward story leans on dialog more than ideas for his stories. Morrison's tendency to write elliptically and lump concepts together is off-putting to many a reader, and with a career as long as his in comics, those looking at sales figures should also be taking the anti-Morrison contingent into the equation.

The question then is: who makes a big event? The writer? The publisher? The fans and retailers? And how far down the continuity ladder do they need to fall to tell a story? Even if its a good one (we can all reserve judgment on 'Final Crisis' until later).

But this isn't a good read for someone's first comic!

Comic readers hit the shop every Wednesday like cattle looking for their evening feeding. Being old and curmudgeony, I have no idea what draws the kids into comics in a post-spinner-rack world.

But I also don't buy the argument that Morrison should have felt the obligation to make 'Final Crisis' an entry-level comic, as if its something 10-year old Timmy is going to find at the Piggly Wiggly. As complicated and hype-driven as comics have become, and as hard to obtain as comics now are, it seems a pretty hard pill to swallow that FInal Crisis would, for any reason at all, be someone's very first comic book purchase.

And if it was: Except for the readers who came to the game in 1938, someone has already missed something. Wasn't that always part of the hook? To be dropped headlong into some story or other, and the push to figure out who these kooks in their brightly colored tights actually were? During his run on Uncanny, Claremont may have devised a standard (and eventually painful) method of treating each issue as if it might be the reader's first. But the repetitive cadence of re-introducing all of the characters was one of the first things to go when leadership on the X-titles saw a change.

But, at what point is the reader who has enjoyed the series allowed to enjoy the comic upon its merits as a serial narrative? And at what point do comic writers, soap opera writers, TV series developers, producers of movie sequels, etc... feel the need to get everyone up to speed with more than a dash of expository dialog?

How good would ABC's "Lost" be if, with each episode, they felt the need to rehash not just who every character was, but their entire history?

It's Beyond the Final Crisis

To some degree, 'Final Crisis' is taking more than its fair share of lumps because of the horrendous transition between "Countdown", "Death of the New Gods" and "Final Crisis". And it seems that the dual edged sword of the Mega-Narrative of the DCU's Continuity is that Morrison's series must carry the albatross of the series which preceeded it. And the appropriate levels of scorn heaped upon both.

Rather than rehash prior columns, I'll mention that its the problem with being in the spotlight.

That said, for whatever reason, DC continues to attract a greater degree of criticism from both the readers of their comics and from those who don't. For some reason, everyone has an opinion on "Final Crisis", but reviews for "Secret Invasion" aren't just on the positive side: somehow Marvel has managed to sell 180,000+ comics without registering much on the comics richter scale for fanboy opinion or outrage. Whatever Marvel is doing to maintain that equilibrium among its readership is almost admirable.

Heck, I'm reading "Secret Invasion", and while I'm not overly impressed with the concept of the series, its doesn't seem like anything to get worked up about. And that, perhaps, is the key (and if you think 'Secret Invasion' isn't mired in decades of Continuity, I have a bridge made out of of 'Secret Invasion Saga' issues to sell you).

That said: Strong, devisive opinions of any entertainment media means the story is provoking a reaction. And, in the long run, whether "Final Crisis" outsells "Secret Invasion" this year or not, the ripple effects will be long felt, and in a few years a new generation of comic geeks will be looking for reprints of the series to understand how Barry Allen came back to Earth.


Questions? Comments? Hate mail?

Come on, I can take it.

=======


Ryan is an Op/Ed columnist for Comic Fodder. He keeps his comics and himself in Austin, Texas where he manages the long running blog League of Melbotis.

He likes Superman.

You can reach Ryan (aka: The League) at theleague.cf@gmail.com

I'll take some of his assertions (more or less) point-by-point:

1. As a long-time fan of Raymond Chandler, I'm used to the unexpected plot twists with, as Ryan notes, the first murder being the entree to a wider story. To some extent, I blame the Internets for this. In the online medium, writing is clipped, short and direct. And I really do think that's affected the way many people process their information. If a story is not immediately obvious to you, then it's not worthwhile. This, of course, would be news to Dickens and Dostoevsky, who took ages to tell their stories.

2. I was initially on the "This Isn't a Good Entry-Level Comic" tip pursued by Occasional Superheroine and some others. But I think there's a broader debate about who comics are really published for these days. I don't think I'd hand my daughter a copy of "Batman," or even "Justice Society" these days as her first comic.
In terms of plotting and sophistication of content, it's worlds away from the Dick Giordano-written issue of Batman that was thrust into my hands sometime in the mid-70s ('75 or '76, I think?) and sparked my lifelong addiction to the medium -- not to mention my lifelong loyalty to DC.
These days, comics are written for us aging fanboys and young adults mature enough to process the content. The "Johnny DC" line at DC is the "training wheels" line that'll ease the youngsters into comics. I don't know, off the top of my head, whether Marvel has a functional equivalent.

3. As to Morrison, I can go both ways on him. His run on "Animal Man," in the 1980s is still among my favorite series, ditto for his initial run on JLA in the mid-90s. His current run on "Batman," makes me a little nuts. And I persevered through "Seven Soldiers," even though there were some books in the series ("Frankenstein," anyone?) that I couldn't abide. If nothing else, it proved to be great backgrounding for "Final Crisis."

4. Continuity is King -- within reason. You should allow writers some artistic license. That said, events in one book should not totally confound things happening elsewhere. A certain narrative cohesiveness is necessary to a fully realized fictional universe. If Green Arrow's hair is blonde in one book, it should be blonde in another.

5. The Web can sometimes be an echo ... echo ... echo ... echo ... echo ... echo ... echo ... echo chamber. For all its vaunted independence, there's a certain catholicism/rigid orthodoxy about 'blogs that drives me nuts. There's quite a lot of groupthink (ie: DC is bad, bad, bad, bad). After all, in what other universe would a beautiful woman like Jennifer Love Hewitt be demonized as fat because she took a bad picture? Only in a universe populated by hopeless shut-ins, I'd say.

6. All that said, I wish I were feeling as excited as I was a few years ago about the books I'm reading. There's maybe a half-dozen that truly thrill me, and others that I buy out of habit/loyalty. But @ $2.99/$3.99 a pop, loyalty/habit isn't a good enough reason in a time of skyrocketing gas prices and rising food prices. By comparison, comics are a luxury good, thus the product should be up to snuff as well.

-- Posted by: John Micek at July 9, 2008 10:27 AM

I don't buy the "This Isn't a Good Entry-Level Comic" argument. Why would anyone think that a series titled "Final Crisis" or "final" anything for that matter be a good jumping on point? It seems to me it would be a better place for things to end.

-- Posted by: Simon MacDonald at July 10, 2008 1:12 PM

Hey Ryan,

Great post. This is the first chance I’ve had to reply but I’ve had it on the brain since I read your essay yesterday.

I hear what you are saying and all of the public bitching and moaning (which I am a part—I fully admit it) perhaps isn’t helping and perhaps it’s even emboldening DC Management to get their back up and to press forward.

But other than complaining, the only alternative course of action for fans/customers to take is to sheath their wallets and stop buying comic books (or at least DC comic books)—something that once seemed inconceivable but not it’s….NOT impossible.

I want to answer a couple of your points here but you should know that I’ve posted a much longer answer/discussion to your essay on my own blog http://fanboywonder.blogspot.com to which I have both directed folks to read your essay in full but I also welcome and encourage you to have a look and address points that aren’t addressed here in your “house.”

(Could this be the makings of a fanboy blog cross-over “event”? EGAD! :)

Point by point—let’s get it on:

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

“The supposed failure of "Final Crisis" was chalked up not so much to sales figures, but to narrative problems. Online critics have bashed Final Crisis for a few reasons.
(a) the story is too complicated and should be summed up in a single sentence.
“I confess to being a bit flabbergasted by the first criticism of "Final Crisis". It is true that Hollywood exists thanks to high-concept ideas, plus attractive women, plus explosions. The insistence that the reason "Secret Invasion" is selling so well, while "Final Crisis" is supposedly not (Secret Invasion outsold Final crisis by about 40,000 copies. Bully for Marvel on their success), is the one sentence concept. “

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

The trouble is that Marvel took the trouble to sell the reader on Secret Invasion by deploying the “one sentence concept.” DC by contrast, let us know a year ago that Final Crisis was coming but made no real effort to convince to read it—only that we had to read the main title and ALL of the companion titles.

At the heart of DC‘s non-selling selling point is “Trust us! This isn’t like all of the other times,” which for many fans is hard to swallow after Infinite Crisis, 52/World War III, Countdown and its many headed spin-offs that didn’t turn out to be count.

Add to that an economy that’s in a (in fact if not in name) inflation, and taking the leap of faith with DC Final Crisis seems more like walking off a cliff.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

“A lot of these criticisms also appeared during the first issue of the series, which was more or less prologue to the main action of the series. Perhaps Morrison should have turned up the heat for the first issue, but this reader can't help buy wonder if those other reviewers were jumping to conclusions about a comic which they hadn't seen to even partial completion. How would any work in any other medium stand up to criticism if the reviewer wrote their review based upon the first few minutes?”

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

I’m afraid I must totally disagree with you here Ryan. Yours would be a not unfair point except that the comics publisher demands money--$3.99—for each “chapter.” The moment money changes hands, it becomes fair game for criticism and it really isn’t unreasonable to expect each issue to stand alone—at least enough to be a satisfying read—while building to a greater whole.

Battlestar Galactica or Lost or some such may have an ultimate ending but if viewers are satisfied with individual episodes, they will stop watching and the show will be canceled in short order. And the only thing a television viewer is requires to spend per episode is time.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
“To some degree, 'Final Crisis' is taking more than its fair share of lumps because of the horrendous transition between "Countdown", "Death of the New Gods" and "Final Crisis". And it seems that the dual edged sword of the Mega-Narrative of the DCU's Continuity is that Morrison's series must carry the albatross of the series which preceded it. And the appropriate levels of scorn heaped upon both. “

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

You are right. I’ve made no bones about the fact that I’m judging Final Crisis not just on its own merits but am I really at fault for that? DC is counting on Final Crisis (vainly I fear) to act as a counterweight to the plethora of failures occurred in a short period of time.

Face if, and the operative word is “if” Final Crisis does become a run away hit and win over skeptical fans (believe or not I’m still trying to keep and open mind—provided they can win me with my having to purchase nothing but the main FC title) all will, if not forgotten but at least forgiven.

Ryan you took the time to craft a well thought out essay. I agree with some and (as you can see) disagree elsewhere. The thing is I think you are right. But the hell of it is, I’m right too.

Maybe we should just reset the clock to January 1986 immediately following the Crisis on Infinite Earths and re-start the DC Universe all over again—again.

Cheers,
FanBoyWonder


-- Posted by: FanBoyWonder at July 10, 2008 11:08 PM

I sincerely appreciate everyone's well articulated comments! It's a pleasure to talk comics when people are actually talking in the comments section and really discussing the finer points. It seems almost unique to Comic Fodder for some reason, and its part of why I wanted to come back.

I'll be hopping over to your site, FanBoyWonder, to see if I can't chime in.

John, your comments are dead on. I guess follow me on over to FBW's site and we can chat up the cost of comics and risk management.

-- Posted by: Ryan at July 11, 2008 12:29 AM

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