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Shyamalan Backs Theaters

M. Night Shyamalan IMDB has a nugget via Studio Briefing, that M. Night Shyamalan wants to keep a window between the box office release, and the home video release. The Philadelphia based director pointed out that any such closing of the window would lead to the death of the movie theater as an institution. The nugget goes on to refer to an article in the LA Times that expands on his remarks and outlines a disagreement Shyamalan has with fellow director Steven Soderbergh. Soderbergh agrees with the industry's move to simultaneous release.

Being from Philadelphia myself, I am forced by local statute to support Shyamalan. However, I do disagree with him. As much as the shakeup to the theater industry is sad, and the possible death of the theater is lamentable, it is not enough to prevent progress. Families can no longer afford to go to the theater regularly. Home theater, video on demand, and faster broadband speeds all are all killing the theater. To protect the theaters through artificial means of limiting production (IE. holding back the home release when there is no technological reason to do so,) is not the answer. There are plenty of other industries where consumers can obtain corresponding services at home, restaurants, bars, coffee shops. The theater industry needs to figure out a way to deliver something to the consumers that they cannot obtain at home, not be artificially protected. --Terrence Ryan

 

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Posted by on October 28, 2005 10:45 PM
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