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Farrelly Brothers Take On Special Olympics

In a move that could result in box office gold, or an angry mob of offended audience members, the directing team of Bobby and Peter Farrelly will be setting their next film at the Special Olympics. Mercury News reports that "Ringer" will have the complete support of the organization that administers the Special Olympics. The chairman of the Special Olympics, Tim Shriver, believes that the increased visibility for the organization and the display of the humanity of the athletes offsets the risk to the reputation of the participants. This seems to back up the claims of the Farrelly Brothers, that the film will show that the disabled are much more that inspiring characters in tear jerkers, they're individuals capable of humor in addition to the wide range of human experience. The directing team has shown that they can do this before, with "Shallow Hal" and its treatment of the obese. There is every reason to believe that they can do it again.

The plot leaves lots of room for the disabled to come off better than the "normal." Johnny Knoxville will play the main character, who pretends to be mentally disabled, as part of a money making scheme orchestrated by his slimy uncle. They believe that the Knoxville character will be the one eyed man, in the land of the blind. The obvious joke will have Knoxville's character learn the hard way that mental disability has no effect on the land speed of your average human. --Terrence Ryan


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Posted by on December 8, 2005 9:12 PM
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