Sign Up for the Daily Filmfodder Newsletter       

Movie News

Roger Ebert Checks In With Oscar Report

Roger Ebert must be feeling better these days. Since undergoing cancer surgery in June of last year, Ebert has understandably posted very infrequent articles and reviews, but this morning his website features a dissection of the Oscar nominations, which were announced earlier this week.

He makes note of the fact that this year's contenders "contain a few titles that most moviegoers haven't seen and some they haven't heard of." He goes on to guess this means Academy voters are actually "doing their homework" and viewing movies that fall outside the mainstream box office. This would be a notion close to Ebert's heart--since 1999 he has hosted the annual Overlooked Film Festival in Champaign, Illinois, which aims to expose deserving films which don't otherwise receive attention.

An argument, and a fairly strong one, can be made that Ebert is the preeminent film critic of our time--certainly he is the layman's critic of choice, and has been since the early 1980s when he and Gene Siskel began teaming for their thumbs-up/thumbs-down weekly PBS (later syndicated) television show. It's nice to know we'll be getting him back, full strength, and soon.


Tags:
Posted by on January 25, 2007 11:20 AM
Permalink | Email to a Friend | Add to del.icio.us | Digg This





I'm relieved that Ebert is back. I'm a regular reader of his website and have felt aimless in my theater-going. It's silly, but I don't really trust other reviewers, even if I don't always agree with him.

-- Posted by: David V. at January 26, 2007 3:03 PM

More Recent Stories:
Ten Best Films of 2007
Utah Film Critics Praise “No Country”
Detroit Critics Name “No Country” Best Film
Hudson, Latifah and Okonedo have a “Secret”
Raimi Returns to Horror With “Hell”
Phoenix Critics Pick “No Country” as Year’s Best
Affleck to Replace Norton in “State of Play”
Peter Jackson to make "The Hobbit"
McGregor and Carrey to Share On-Screen Romance
Dallas Critics applaud "No Country for Old Men"